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Monday, February 12, 2018

House Bill Giving Churches Flexibility on Carry Decisions Dies in House Friday

On Friday, HB1180, a bill that repeals the statutory prohibition on carrying a gun, pistol, bowie knife, dagger, or other dangerous weapon, without "good and sufficient reason" to a place of worship while a meeting for religious purposes, was referred to the Committee on Courts of Justice from the full House, essentially killing the bill in the House as all committees had to complete their work ahead of today's Crossover.  The patron of the bill, Delegate Dave LaRock, made the motion at the beginning of Friday's session.  No explanation was given at the time of the motion.  An identical bill has already passed the Senate and is awaiting action in the House.

As was mentioned in Friday's morning's Legislative Update, all this bill does is frees churches to make their own decisions on security 24 hours a day, while current law limits options during a service. As was also mentioned on Friday, Democrats are likely going to try and reverse former Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli's opinion that self-defense is a "good and sufficient reason" to carry in a church during a regularly scheduled service.  This can be done by simply requesting a new opinion from the new Attorney General, Mark Herring.

The Senate bill is still alive, though Governor Northam has stated that he will veto the bill if it reaches his desk. 

Friday, February 9, 2018

Annual Christopher Newport University Poll Continues to Push Gun Control

The Christopher Newport University Wason Center for Public Policy released it's annual poll of issues being considered at the General Assembly earlier this week.  While the narrative in the poll is the public overwhelmingly supports gun control, when you dig into the poll, you see that the actual questions asked do not offer a detailed explanation of the issues polled and are simplistic at best.

For instance, while the Wason Center says 84 percent of respondents "support background checks for private gun sales" including "even 76 percent of Republican respondents", the actual question asked was:
  • Q16: There are several bills before the General Assembly related to guns and gun safety. As I describe each one, please tell me if you support or oppose it.
  • A. Making private gun sales and sales at gun shows subject to background checks:
Absolutely no explanation of what proposals on private gun sales means.  And, the vast majority of sales at gun shows already undergo a background check.  The way this question is asked, it gives the impression to those less informed,  no such checks are performed at gun shows.  Regarding private sales, it is very likely the numbers would have been lower had the poll explained that proposals, and laws in other states related to private sales, don't cover just sales, but "transfers."  A "transfer" includes you loaning a firearm to a spouse or boy/girlfriend,  training class attendee, or a friend at the range. While those pushing such changes in Virginia law learned from the experience in other states and included specific allowances for immediate family or loaning for hunting or target shooting, they still require a background check to be performed on family members beyond immediate family, lifelong friends, and members of your local gun club.

Here's the wording for the so-called "assault weapons" questions.
  • B. A ban on assault-style weapons:
And finally, on the issue of "Constitutional Carry":
  • C. Allow anyone who legally owns a gun to conceal carry without a permit:
Again, no explanation that so-called "assault-style weapons" are simply semi-automatic firearms that shoot no differently than the common hunting rifle or offering additional information like "Vermont currently allows law-abiding gun owners to carry a concealed firearm without a permit, would you support such a policy in Virginia".

Unfortunately, Americans are uninformed on many issues.  Polls with such simplistic questions play right in to that ignorance.  A more reliable poll would take the time to explain the issues being polled.

Legislative Update for February 9th

As we approach the February 13th Crossover Day (the last day to consider legislation in the House of origin) all but a handful of firearm related bills have been heard in committee.  The good news is of those bills heard, all of the bad bills have been defeated.  The bad news is a number of the good bills have died, or been softly killed by carrying them over to next year.  It is rare that a bill carried over survives to actually see the light of day in the following session.  This week, Senate Finance carried over SB48, the Constitutional Carry bill, and SB350, a bill that would extend the expiration date for Concealed Handgun Permits (CHPs) from 5 to 15 years.  The thing is, both were essentially killed because of a supposed "fiscal impact", yet the fees charged for CHPs are only supposed to cover the costs of processing so if you a) no longer need a permit to carry concealed as with Constitutional Carry or b) only have to process once every 15 years instead of 5 years, there is no fiscal impact.

On the positive side, Senate Finance did report to the full Senate SB715, a bill that would allow firefighters and EMTs to carry concealed on the job.  That bill will be on final approval in the Senate next week.

In the House, HB1180, a bill that repeals the statutory prohibition on carrying a gun, pistol, bowie knife, dagger, or other dangerous weapon, without "good and sufficient reason" to a place of worship while a meeting for religious purposes, continues to be passed by for the day.  This is usually a sign that there is a problem, which does not make a lot of sense because the Senate has already passed it's version of the bill, albeit along party lines.  All this bill does is frees churches to make their own decisions on security 24 hours a day, while current law limits options during a service. Word is, Democrats intend to reverse former Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli's opinion that self-defense is a "good and sufficient reason" to carry in a church during a regularly scheduled service.  Please contact your Delegate today and urge them to vote for HB1180.  Be sure to explain that this bill does not force churches to allow carry, it only frees them up to make those decisions on their own based on their security needs.

Finally, the small number of bad bills that still remain alive are in House Courts of Justice.  Those bills have not come up for a hearing to date.  The list of bills remaining are below:
  • HB 43 Firearms; reporting when lost or stolen.
  • HB 198 Firearms; removal from persons posing substantial risk, penalties.
  • HB 707 Firearms; allowing access to children, penalty.
  • HB 1327 Pneumatic guns; Class 6 felony to possess on school property, etc.
  • HB 1385 Concealed handguns; disqualifications for permit, adjudications of delinquency.
  • HB 1544 Firearms; possession, etc., following convictions for certain misdemeanor crimes, penalty.
There is a good bill that is also awaiting action in House Courts of Justice:
  • HB 408 Right to keep & bear arms; codifies opinion of Supreme Court of the U.S. in D.C. v. Heller.
VSSA will continue to let members know if your action is needed on any of the above bills.

Friday, February 2, 2018

Legislative Update - Good Week for Virginia Gun Owners

It was a good week for Virginia gun owners in the General Assembly this week as more of Governor Northam's gun ban agenda was defeated in Senate and House of Delegate committees.  First on Wednesday, Senate Finance dispensed with a bill that would ban bump stocks (SB1), and a bill that would add private and public preschools and day care centers as places where firearms are banned (SB79).  In the House of Delegates, the Militia, Police, and Public Safety Committee Subcommittee #1 met for three hours last night and disposed of a long list of bad bills as well as advancing three good bills.  First, the good bills that advanced:
  • HB681 Nonresident concealed handgun permits; time of issuance. Requires the Department of State Police (Department) to issue a concealed handgun permit to a nonresident within 45 days of receipt of the nonresident's completed application unless it determines that he is disqualified. Reported and referred to Appropriations
  • HB1255 Concealed handgun permits. Allows any person who is otherwise eligible to obtain a concealed handgun permit to carry a concealed handgun without a permit anywhere he may lawfully carry a handgun openly within the Commonwealth. (Constitutional Carry) Reported and referred to Appropriations 
  • HB1398  Application for a concealed handgun permit. Allows a Virginia resident or domiciliary to submit an application for a new concealed handgun permit via mail. Currently, only persons who have previously been issued a concealed handgun permit may submit an application via mail. Reported and referred to Appropriation.
The bad bills that were defeated are below:
  • HB68 Firearms; libraries owned or operated by localities.
  • HB261 Localities; regulation of firearms in government buildings.
  • HB597 Firearms; mechanical devices designed to increase the rate of fire, penalty.
  • HB648 Transfer of multiple firearms; report to the Department of State Police. (requires dealer who sells more than two firearms to one individual to notify the state police)
  • HB649 Firearms, certain; prohibited public carrying, penalty.
  • HB814 Firearms; control by localities, lawful demonstrations and protests.
  • HB819 Firearms; prohibits mechanical devices designed to increase rate of fire, penalty.
  • HB929 Licensed family day homes; storage of firearms.
  • HB949 Firearms; transfer, criminal history record check delay.
  • HB950 Firearm or pneumatic gun; allowing access by children age four or younger, penalty.
  • HB1009 Firearms, certain; prohibited public carrying, penalty.
  • HB1019 Firearms, etc.; permitted events.
  • HB1052 Firearms; control by localities, lawful demonstrations and protests.
  • HB1394 Firearms show; list of vendors or exhibitors submitted to State Police.
It should be noted that the subcommittee failed to recommend reporting one bill that VSSA remained neutral because it continues something that the General Assembly has regularly done in the past - set up a separate class of gun owners (in this case retired-law enforcement) that is able to exercise rights that all of us should be able to exercise.

  • HB1443 Concealed handguns; retired law-enforcement officers may carry without a permit, etc.
When the Session began, there was a huge question what such a small pro-rights majority and the loss of so many good Second Amendment supporting legislators would mean for gun owners.  Would some of the remaining members be open to supporting things like banning common firearm accessories like bump stocks?  The results of the first half of the session have been positive in that all of the bad bills that have come before committees to date have been defeated.  A small number of pro-rights bills still remain alive and the VSSA Legislative Team will continue to work for passage of those bills.

UPDATE: HB 1180, a bill that would repeal the prohibition the  "good and sufficient reason" to carry during a church service, was reported by the full Militia, Police, and Public Safety Committee this morning by a 12 to 9 vote! (The Senate version, SB 372, has already passed the Senate and awaits action in the House - the Governor has vowed to veto it if it reaches his desk). HB 1180 now heads to the full House for a vote, likely Tuesday or Wednesday. Please contact your Delegate now and urge him or her to vote to pass HB1180!

Also in the House today, HB172 which would exempt gun safes under $1000 from state sales tax died in House Finance Subcommittee #3 on 5-3 vote to Pass by Indefinitely.

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Gun Bills on House Subcommittee Docket This Afternoon

The Militia, Police, and Public Safety Committee Subcommittee #1 will meet today at 4:00 PM.  There are 19 firearm related bills on the docket and the subcommittee has blocked them so that similar bills will be taken up together.  The list of bills is below.  There are a small number of bills that are pro-rights and they are noted in the list.  The last bill in Block 5 is not opposed by VSSA but it continues to set up a special class of gun owners to exercise rights that the rest of us cannot.  Updates will be posted via Twitter and Facebook as they occur during the meeting.

Block 1
HB68 Firearms; libraries owned or operated by localities.
HB261 Localities; regulation of firearms in government buildings.

Block 2
HB597 Firearms; mechanical devices designed to increase the rate of fire, penalty.
HB819 Firearms; prohibits mechanical devices designed to increase rate of fire, penalty.

Block 3
HB649 Firearms, certain; prohibited public carrying, penalty.
HB1009 Firearms, certain; prohibited public carrying, penalty.

Block 4
HB814 Firearms; control by localities, lawful demonstrations and protests.
HB1019 Firearms, etc.; permitted events.
HB1052 Firearms; control by localities, lawful demonstrations and protests.

Block 5
HB603 Concealed handgun permits, nonresident; fee. (increases fee from $100 to $150)
HB648 Transfer of multiple firearms; report to the Department of State Police. (requires dealer who sells more than two firearms to one individual to notify the state police)
HB681 Nonresident concealed handgun permits; time of issuance. (this is a good bill)
HB929 Licensed family day homes; storage of firearms.
HB949 Firearms; transfer, criminal history record check delay.
HB950 Firearm or pneumatic gun; allowing access by children age four or younger, penalty.
HB1255 Concealed handgun; eligibility to carry openly within Commonwealth. (Constitutional Carry - good bill)
HB1394 Firearms show; list of vendors or exhibitors submitted to State Police.
HB1398 Concealed handgun permit; new application via mail. (this is a good bill)
HB1443 Concealed handguns; retired law-enforcement officers may carry without a permit, etc.

Friday, January 26, 2018

House of Delegates Subcommittee Shuts Down Northam Gun Control Legislation

If you follow VSSA's Twitter and Facebook feeds, you already know that last evening the Militia, Police and Public Safety Committee Subcommittee #1 dealt a major blow to Governor Northam's attempts to remake Virginia in the image of New Jersey and California.  The VSSA legislative team was live tweeting the results as they occurred and every gun control bill on the docket was defeated.  In all, 15 bills were on the docket, including a bill to ban bump stocks (HB41),  bills criminalizing private firearms sales (HB140) (HB721)(HB977)(HB1373)(HB717), bills to reinstate handgun rationing (HB353) (HB650), bills to limit the size of ammunition magazines to no more than 10 rounds (HB596) (HB1145)(HB927), and a bill requiring a permit to purchase handguns (HB 1143).  There was also a bill holding the seller of a privately owned firearm civilly libel if the firearm was transferred without a background check and is later used in a crime.  Finally, HB498, a bill that would have rolled back the out of state concealed carry reciprocity agreement by Governor Terry McAuliffe and the General Assembly last year also was defeated.  You can see the entire list of bills and the result of each committee vote by clicking here.

There is still some firearm related legislation in the House that will be heard next week, but the results last night are a good sign for the handful of bills that were reported by Senate Courts of Justice and awaiting action in Senate Finance.  One of those bills is a bump stock ban.  The fact that the House subcommittee handily defeated the House version of the bill means that even if it does pass the Senate, it will likely meet it's doom in the House.

Thanks to everyone that answered responded to the request on Wednesday to contact committee members and made their voices heard on the above bills.

In news from the State Senate this week, one bill has been approved by the Senate (SB372), which repeals the statutory prohibition on carrying a gun, pistol, bowie knife, dagger, or other dangerous weapon, without good and sufficient reason, to a place of worship while a meeting for religious purposes is being held.  The bill passed 21-18 and is now awaiting action in the House of Delegates.

The VSSA legislative team remains active even though most all of the gun ban legislation has been defeated.  Continue to check this blog, as well as the VSSA Twitter and Facebook feeds for updates.

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Firearm Bills Start to Move in House of Delegates

The House Militia, Police and Public Safety Committee Subcommittee #1 will take up 17 firearm related bills on Thursday at 4:00 PM.  Bills on the docket include legislation to ban bump stocks, bills to reinstate handgun rationing, banning ammunition magazines that hold more that 10 rounds, and a bill to require a permit to purchase a handgun.  The full list is below.

HB41 Firearms; mechanical devices designed to increase rate of fire, penalty.
Mechanical devices designed to increase the rate of fire of firearms; penalty. Prohibits the manufacture, import, sale or offer to sell, possession, transfer, or transportation of any device used to increase the rate of fire of any semi-automatic firearm beyond the capability of an unaided person to operate the trigger mechanism of that firearm. A violation is punishable as a Class 1 misdemeanor.

HB91 Concealed handgun permits; demonstration of competence.
Concealed handgun permits; demonstration of competence. Removes the option for concealed handgun permit applicants to demonstrate competence with a handgun by completing an electronic, video, or online course conducted by a state-certified or National Rifle Association-certified firearms instructor. The bill does not affect any in-person means of satisfying the requirement to demonstrate competence with a handgun under current law.

HB602 Concealed handgun permits; demonstration of competence.
Concealed handgun permits; demonstration of competence. Removes the option for concealed handgun permit applicants to demonstrate competence with a handgun by completing an electronic, video, or online course conducted by a state-certified or National Rifle Association-certified firearms instructor. The bill does not affect any in-person means of satisfying the requirement to demonstrate competence with a handgun under current law.

HB140 Firearm transfers; criminal history record information checks, penalty.
Firearm transfers; criminal history record information checks; penalty. Requires a background check for any firearm transfer and requires the Department of State Police to establish a process for transferors to obtain such a check from licensed firearms dealers. A transferor who fails to obtain a required background check and sells the firearm to another person is guilty of a Class1 misdemeanor. The bill exempts transfers between immediate family members, transfers that occur by operation of law, transfers by the executor or administrator of an estate or by the trustee of a testamentary trust, and temporary transfers that occur in the presence of the owner of the firearm or are necessary to prevent imminent death or serious bodily injury. The bill removes the provision that makes background checks of prospective purchasers or transferees at firearms shows voluntary.

HB721 Firearm transfers; criminal history record information checks, penalty.
Firearm transfers; criminal history record information checks; penalty. Requires a background check for any firearm transfer and requires the Department of State Police to establish a process for transferors to obtain such a check from licensed firearms dealers. A transferor who fails to obtain a required background check and sells the firearm to another person is guilty of a Class1 misdemeanor. The bill exempts transfers between immediate family members, transfers that occur by operation of law, transfers by the executor or administrator of an estate or by the trustee of a testamentary trust, and temporary transfers that (i) occur within the continuous presence of the owner of the firearm; (ii) are necessary to prevent imminent death or serious bodily injury; (iii) occur at a shooting range, shooting gallery, or other area designed for the purpose of target shooting, for use during target practice, a firearms safety or training course or class, a shooting competition, or any similar lawful activity; or (iv) are for the purpose of and while the transferee is engaged in hunting, trapping, or target shooting. The bill removes the provision that makes background checks of prospective purchasers or transferees at firearms shows voluntary.

HB977 Firearm transfers; criminal history record information checks, penalty.
Firearm transfers; criminal history record information checks; penalty. Requires a background check for any firearm transfer and requires the Department of State Police to establish a process for transferors to obtain such a check from licensed firearms dealers. A transferor who fails to obtain a required background check and sells the firearm to another person is guilty of a Class1 misdemeanor. The bill exempts transfers between immediate family members, transfers that occur by operation of law, transfers by the executor or administrator of an estate or by the trustee of a testamentary trust, and temporary transfers that occur in the presence of the owner of the firearm or are necessary to prevent imminent death or serious bodily injury. The bill removes the provision that makes background checks of prospective purchasers or transferees at firearms shows voluntary.

HB1373 Firearm transfers; criminal history record information checks, penalty.
Firearm transfers; criminal history record information checks; penalty. Requires a background check for any firearm transfer and directs the Department of State Police (the Department) to establish a process for transferors to obtain such a check from licensed firearms dealers. A transferor who sells a firearm to another person without obtaining the required background check is guilty of a Class 6 felony. The bill exempts transfers (i) between immediate family members, (ii) that occur by operation of law, (iii) by the executor or administrator of an estate or by the trustee of a testamentary trust, and (iv) that are temporary and occur in the presence of the owner of the firearm or are necessary to prevent imminent death or serious bodily injury. The bill removes the provision that makes background checks of prospective purchasers or transferees at firearms shows voluntary. The bill also provides that the Department shall have three business days to complete a criminal history record information check before a firearm may be transferred.

HB717 Firearms; criminal history record information check on transferee, penalties.
Transfer of firearms; criminal history record information check; penalties. Requires that a criminal history record information check be performed on the prospective transferee before a vendor, defined in the bill, may transfer firearms at a gun show. A violation is a Class 6 felony. The bill also requires that the promoter of a firearms show post notice of the requirement for a criminal history record information check and provide vendors with access to licensed dealers who will conduct the criminal history record information check. The bill repeals a provision added by the2016 Session of the General Assembly that requires the Department of State Police to be available to perform background checks for non-dealer sales at firearms shows if requested by a party involved in a transaction.

HB1143 Handguns; transfer permit required, penalties.
Transfer of handguns; permit required; penalties. Requires the Department of State Police to establish procedures for issuing handgun transfer permits and provides that a person who willfully and intentionally transfers a firearm to a person without a permit is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill provides exceptions to this requirement, including an exemption for dealers who obtain a background check. The bill provides that any person who displays a handgun transfer permit that has been revoked or suspended knowing that such permit has been revoked or suspended is guilty of a Class1 misdemeanor. In order for the bill to become effective, the U.S. Department of Justice must approve the policies and procedures that the Department of State Police will use to implement the provisions of the bill.

HB353 Handguns; limitation on purchases, penalty.
Purchase of handguns; limitation on handgun purchases; penalty. Prohibits any person who is not a licensed firearms dealer from purchasing more than one handgun in a 30-dayperiod and establishes such an offense as a Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill exempts from this provision (i) persons who have been issued a certificate by the Department of State Police under certain circumstances and with an enhanced background check, (ii) law-enforcement agencies and officers, (iii) state and local correctional facilities, (iv)licensed private security companies, (v) persons who hold a valid Virginia concealed handgun permit, (vi) persons whose handgun has been stolen or irretrievably lost or who are trading in a handgun,(vii) purchases of handguns in a private sale, and (viii) purchases of antique firearms.

HB650 Handguns; limitation on purchases, penalty.
Purchase of handguns; limitation on handgun purchases; penalty. Prohibits any person who is not a licensed firearms dealer from purchasing more than one handgun in a 30-dayperiod and establishes such an offense as a Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill exempts from this provision (i) persons who have been issued a certificate by the Department of State Police under certain circumstances and with an enhanced background check, (ii) law-enforcement agencies and officers, (iii) state and local correctional facilities, (iv)licensed private security companies, (v) persons who hold a valid Virginia concealed handgun permit, (vi) persons whose handgun has been stolen or irretrievably lost or who are trading in a handgun,(vii) purchases of handguns in a private sale, and (viii) purchases of antique firearms.

HB596 Firearm magazines; prohibition of sale, transfer, etc., fine.
Prohibition of sale, transfer, etc., of certain firearms magazines; fine. Provides that any person, corporation, or other entity that manufactures, imports, possesses, purchases, sells, or transfers any large capacity magazine shall be subject to a $500 fine. The bill provides exceptions to the prohibition. The bill provides that a registrant is limited to three large capacity magazines and must otherwise dispose of all magazines in excess of the limit. The bill requires the Department of State Police to provide a means to register a large capacity magazine and, at the time of registration, to permanently mark such magazine for the purpose of identification and maintain records regarding such identification information. Finally, the bill provides that any large capacity magazine that is possessed in violation of law is subject to forfeiture to the Commonwealth.

HB1145 Firearms magazines, certain; prohibition of sale, transfer, etc., fine.
Prohibition of sale, transfer, etc., of certain firearms magazines; fine. Provides that any person, corporation, or other entity that manufactures, imports, possesses, purchases, sells, or transfers any large capacity magazine shall be subject to a $250 fine. The bill provides exceptions to the prohibition. The bill provides that a registrant is limited to three large capacity magazines and must otherwise dispose of all magazines in excess of the limit. The bill requires the Department of State Police to provide a means to register a large capacity magazine and, at the time of registration, to permanently mark such magazine for the purpose of identification and maintain records regarding such identification information. Finally, the bill provides that any large capacity magazine that is possessed in violation of law is subject to forfeiture to the Commonwealth.

HB927 Firearms magazines and firearms, certain; prohibition of sale, transfer, etc., penalties.
Prohibition of sale, transfer, etc., of certain firearms magazines and firearms; penalties. Prohibits any person from importing, selling, bartering, or transferring a firearms magazine designed to hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition. A violation is a Class 6 felony. The bill prohibits a person from carrying semi-automatic center-fire firearms with more than 10 rounds of ammunition in a public place; under existing law, this prohibition applies only in certain localities and only to such firearms if the firearm holds more than 20 rounds of ammunition. The bill also increases from a Class 1 misdemeanor to a Class 6 felony the penalty for carrying a semi-automatic center-fire firearm and a shotgun with a magazine that will hold more than seven rounds of the longest ammunition for which it is chambered in a public place. The bill redefines "assault firearm" by reducing from more than 20 to more than 10 the number of rounds of ammunition that a firearms magazine will hold in order to be defined as an "assault firearm" and prohibits a dealer from selling, renting, trading, or transferring from his inventory such an assault firearm to any person. The bill also reduces from more than 20 to more than 10 the number of rounds of ammunition that a firearms magazine will hold in order to be defined as an "assault firearm" for purposes of possession or transportation by a person younger than 18 years of age and increases the penalty from a Class 1 misdemeanor to a Class 6 felony for a person younger than 18 years of age to possess or transport a handgun, an assault firearm, or a shotgun with a magazine that will hold more than seven rounds of the longest ammunition for which it is chambered, with some exceptions.

HB273 Firearms; civil liability for sale or transfer, background check.
Civil liability for sale or transfer of a firearm; background check. Provides that a person is civilly liable for injuries to person or property or wrongful death of another caused by a third party if it can be shown that the civil defendant sold or transferred a firearm to the person who committed the crime resulting in injury or death without obtaining a background check and verification that the transferee was not prohibited from possessing a firearm.

HB281 Firearms, certain; possession by minors, parental permission, penalty.
Relating to possession of certain firearms by minors; parental permission; penalty. Requires any minor who possesses certain firearms in the home or on the property of his parent, grandparent, or legal guardian to have prior permission from such parent, grandparent, or legal guardian to possess such firearms.

HB498 Concealed handgun permits, out-of-state; reciprocity.
Out-of-state concealed handgun permits; reciprocity. Eliminates the recent expansion of the recognition of concealed handgun permits issued by other states and reinstates the prior law that provides that Virginia will recognize concealed handgun permits issued by other states that (i) provide a 24-hour-a-day means of verification of the validity of the permits issued in that state and (ii) have requirements and qualifications that are adequate to prevent possession of a permit by persons who would be denied a permit in Virginia. The bill also reinstates the recognition of certain Maryland concealed handgun permits and eliminates the requirement that the Superintendent of State Police enter into agreements for reciprocal recognition of concealed handgun permits or licenses with other states where agreements were in existence on December 1, 2015.

Please contact the sub-committee members and urge them to oppose the above bills on tomorrow's docket.

Monday, January 22, 2018

SHOT Show Means Rolling Out New Products

The Shooting Hunting Outdoor Trade (SHOT) Show starts tomorrow in Las Vegas, Nevada, and as usual, the Monday Range Day ahead of the opening of the exhibition hall on Tuesday is an opportunity for members of the outdoor media to check out the new guns that will be available this year.  One of the products getting a lot of buzz is the new Sig Sauer P365 compact pistol.  Sig Sauer hosted Tom Gresham's Gun Talk program yesterday and there was a lot of talk about this new pistol.



It comes with a 10 and 12 round magazine.  The magazines combine the capacity of a double stack magazine with the reliability of a single stack.

Take a look at the below video for more on this new pistol: